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House Sitting in Philadelphia


Philadelphia: It’s a Revolution! Philly Cheesesteaks, the Liberty Bill, Rocky and More

Fast Fact: If it seems like dogs are everywhere in Philly, that’s because they are. The number of licensed dogs more than tripled from 3,927 in 2012 to 13,248 in 2015, and annual adoptions increased from 6400 to 7500 in the same period.

House Sitting and Pet Sitting in Philadelphia

Situated directly between Washington, DC, and New York City, the City of Brotherly Love is where history comes to life. It pervades the architecture, the top attractions, the museums, the restaurants and more. From the beginning of the Revolutionary War until 1790, when Washington, DC, was founded, it served as the nation’s capital. This is where the Declaration of Independence was signed and the Liberty Bell continues to proclaim liberty throughout the land. Over time, the culture moved to New York and the politics to Washington, DC, leaving the industry to Philly. After some hard decades, the city has re-emerged as a vibrant cultural, historical and business hub. It’s charming, walkable and rich as a destination to both visit and live in.

House Sitting and Pet Sitting in the Metro Areas

There are dozens of neighborhoods in this 136-square-mile city. It’s easier to divide the city up into its six best-known divisions: City Center, West, North, Northeast, Northwest and Southwest. 


City Center
The central business district is the second most populated downtown area in the U.S., second only to Manhattan. It’s bounded by the Delaware River to the east and the Schuykill River to the west. Explore Penn’s Landing, Old City, Society Hill, Chinatown, Logan Square, the Avenue of the Arts and Museum Square, to name a few. The area is incredibly walkable and bike-friendly too, so you’ll have fun exploring an area that is always bustling, day and night.

West
West Philly is a big small town that has deep community ties. This is where gangster rap was invented, Ethiopian food is the real thing, neighbors farm their own food and social activists unite. There are also great parks for sunny weekends, including Clark Park, The Woodlands, Cobbs Creek and Malcolm X. It’s home to both the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University, which is why this area is also called “University City,” infusing the neighborhood with a sometimes edgy-sometimes privileged-upper-middle-class college vibe.

North
Home to Temple University, there is a mix of good and bad associated with north Philadelphia. There is a college vibe that brings great coffee houses, live music and access to public transportation. But when school is not in session, including summer and most weekends, this area of town can be a bit desolate. A lot of stores close on weekends, and there is enough crime that you have to be aware of your surroundings.

Northeast
With all the farms, single-family homes and open space, you’ll forget you’re in the city in northeast Philadelphia. Many residents here work at the acclaimed Fox Chase Cancer Center, an award-winning national cancer institute. You’ll love walking and biking through Pennypack Park, which offers horseback riding, bike trails, hiking trails, playgrounds and more.

Northwest
A gem of northwest Philly is Chestnut Hill, which resembles a suburb more than city living. You’ll find charming single-family homes with private yards, and easy access to downtown.

South/Southwest
This is where you’ll find Passyunk Square, home to the great cheese steak battle of Philadelphia. You’ll find community mosaic beautification projects, community gardens, a mix of long-time residents and newcomers, and hundreds of trees that have been planted to improve the overall quality of life and scenic beauty. The coffee is strong, the Italian food straight from the old country, and pub crawls go from morning to night. Amateurs not allowed 


House Sitting and Pet Sitting in the Suburbs

With lifestyles that are constantly in motion and smaller living spaces that cost a small fortune, many Philly residents opt for the suburbs. Still close to the city, but bigger yards for two- and four-legged children alike.

Devon
Beautiful mansions, sweeping lawns, high-end shopping centers. What’s not to love about Devon? (Except the price tag, of course.) The annual Devon Horse Show draws equestrian lovers from near and far, and this is also ranked as one of the safest cities in the entire metro area.

Wyncote
This picture-perfect Philly suburb has a historic district with more than 200 homes and buildings that take you back in time, including All Hallow’s Church.

Bryn Mawr
Home to its namesake college, this is a vibrant college town in the suburbs. Hookah bars, wine cellars, pubs, eateries—it’s all here. And if it’s not, you can still be downtown Philly in 20 minutes.

Flourtown
Flourtown is family town. It’s further out than some of the other suburbs and the commute to the city can be a bear. That’s why people here tend to stay put and focus on their own special community, like soccer games, school plays and hometown Fourth of July parades. And that’s just the way they like it.

Come for the cheesesteaks, stay for the love. Philadelphia is a quintessential East Coast city that offers everything from towering skyscrapers to historic cottages, dive bars to swanky restaurants, enthusiastic newcomers and longtime locals. And who wouldn’t want to run with a dog up the 72 famous steps immortalized in the movie Rocky at the Philadelphia Museum of Art? 

 
*FREE: House sitting is usually free, for both sitter and house owner, although this is completely up to the individuals. There are usually some costs that need to be covered by either the sitter or the house owner e.g. electricity, phone usage, vet fees etc. How these costs are handled needs to be agreed before the sit begins. House sitters pay a single annual membership fee, while house owners pay nothing to advertise their house or to contact sitters.